Thursday, October 26, 2006

Everything Seems Fine With My Head in The Sand

The New York Times put out a piece today discussing the horrific amount of murders, torture, and kidnapping that is associated with drug Mexican drug cartels. With atrocious levels of violence, Mexican cartels are attacking the Judges, policeman, and citizens in a campaign terror unseen outside of Baghdad. For once, the drugs were not blamed as the cause of the violence. No story about killers doped on whatever drug it is that government windbags espouse as being linked to violence this generation, but rather a story of how the drug trade is to blame.


As much as I am disparaged that the piece by Mr. McKinley fails to question why no one has thought of looking for a solution to this violence, I applaud it for putting the facts out there plainly for all to see, even if it may have been unintentional. The black market of drugs causes violence and death that would not be associated with a regulated market! How often do you hear about Miller vs. Budweiser battles being fought with automatic weapons? When was the last time that Bayer® tortured Glaxo Smith Klien® employees over rights to sell arthritis medicine to a certain hospital? Why do we support this kind of horrible pain and suffering by keeping all drugs illegal?

The most interesting point in the article was this quote:

Mexico’s law enforcement officials maintain that the violence is a sign that they have made progress dismantling the major organized crime families in the country. The arrests of several drug cartel leaders and their top lieutenants have set off a violent struggle among second-rank mobsters for trade routes, federal prosecutors say. The old order has been fractured, and the remaining drug dealers are killing one another or making new alliances.

“These alliances are happening because none of the organizations can control, on its own, the territory it used to control, and that speaks to the crisis that they are in,” said José Luis Santiago Vasconcelos, the top federal prosecutor for organized crime.

So what you are telling me is that every time you destabilize a cartel all you are going to do is increase the violence associated with the drug trade, and yet you are going to continue to plod along this poorly planned path? By turning 10 large organizations into 100 smaller organizations, you just made your job more difficult if not impossible. At what point do you raise your head out of the sand and ask yourself, “Is there a better way to solve this problem?”.

Drugs can be bad. The pain and suffering of drug addiction is reaped onto everyone who loves the addict. However, we must never forget that concentrated pain of prohibition does nothing to ease the pain of addiction, and may in fact make it worse by forcing the addict into the criminal justice system instead of treatment.

3 comments:

YAHOO MESSENGER ID: MYSTIC430Z said...

I'M NOT SURE WHY NO COMMENTS HAVE BEEN ENTERED MAYBE EVERYONE KNOWS THE GOVERNMENT IS LISTENING TO OUR EVERY WORD. ya think ????

IF I UNDERSTOOD WHAT I JUST READ SOUNDS LIKE THE LOGIC IN THIS ARTICLE COULD APPLY TO THE WAR ON TERROR IN IRAG AND THE LAWS BUSH HAS BROKEN TO TORTURE THOSE LABELED TERRORIST SO HE CAN TORTURE THEM IN SECRET PRISONS.

mystic said...

sorry typing error correction:
war in iraq

loved the interview on the news with njweedman

800 pound gorilla said...

It seems that even the DEA has never claimed that any "dangerous drug" - even ones on the scare list - are more addictive than smoked nicotine. Yet, even though big government thrives on "socking it the addict" and cigarette taxes are upwards of half the cost of smoking, nobody is knocking over seven forevers to bankroll their addiction. Alcohol is far more problematic being linked to countless episodes of rioting and domestic violence. However, I don't read much about people stealing cars or breaking into houses to earn their Budweiser money for their local dealer at the seven forever or other convenience store.

I'm not too worried about being detained in secret prisons. I've written a drug education curriculum that isn't selling that well and sales would skyrocket if people learned I was missing and governmental misconduct was suspected. The DEA doesn't want my book in wide circulation among citizen taxpayers. And yes, it is available for free download in PDF. Just type in a search for "dangerous drugs mythology" [exact wording] and over half the entries bring you to the site.